Posts Tagged ‘India’

From India With Unrequited Love

June 14, 2012

A new article by NSF Editorial Board Member Frank Schell, featured in The American Spectator: “From India With Unrequited Love.”

“Deep within the psyche of America is the desire to be loved.  Never a colonial power in the traditional sense, and with a New World cheerfulness unlike the cynicism of so-called Old Europe, America predictably seeks to provide aid monies, investment capital, cultural exchanges, armaments, goodwill, and in the case of India — even nuclear fuel and civilian reactors.  While America has a vested interest in making these offerings to ensure a benign world order, at times we are perplexed when generosity is not met with warm display…”

Please visit the following link to read the rest of the article “From India With Unrequited Love.”

U.S. Strategy in South Asia

September 9, 2011

Illinois Senator Mark Kirk recently issued a statement about his strategy for U.S. aid in Pakistan.  He commented that “In such an environment, and with our deficits and debt, aid to Pakistan seems naive at best and counter-productive at worst. I am seriously reconsidering and rethinking how well aid to Pakistan served us.”  The day after, the Chicago-Sun Times ran an editorial suggesting that the U.S. should pull out of Afghanistan and allow India to become the natural leader of the region.

Whatever the merits, these policy positions have important implications that must be seriously considered by national security policymakers.  Richard E. Friedman has provided an analysis of these policy proposals in his new article titled “Toward a Complementary Strategy for the U.S. in South Asia.”  He warns that eliminating U.S. aid to Pakistan and allowing India to become the regional leader may destabilize the region and lead to outcomes counter to U.S. objectives in South Asia.  For a deeper look at the potential consequences of these proposals, and for an alternative U.S. strategy, click on the link below to read Mr. Friedman’s new commentary.

Toward a Complementary Strategy for the U.S. in South Asia

By Richard E. Friedman

Pakistan: The People Have Their Chance

May 11, 2011

Frank Schell, a member of the National Strategy Forum Review Editorial Board, wrote an op-ed that appeared recently in The American Spectator titled “Pakistan: The People Have Their Chance.”  The article assesses Pakistan’s domestic political and security challenges, and discusses some of the diplomatic obstacles facing U.S. foreign policymakers.

Pakistan is now a major focus of U.S. foreign policy.  The National Strategy Forum Review (NSFR) has published a number of articles about the U.S.-Pakistan and Pakistan-India relationships.  The most recent articles, listed below, provide both background information and policy suggestions.

American Foreign Policy Towards Pakistan, by Richard E. Friedman, Frank Schell, and Lauren Bean, is found in the Fall 2009 issue of the NSFR: Strategic Challenges Near and Far (available in PDF).

Conditions Needed for an India-Pakistan Rapprochement, by B. D. Jayal, is found in the Spring 2010 issue of the NSFR.

U.S. Complementary Strategy: The Pakistan Opportunity, by Richard E. Friedman, is found in the Winter 2011 issue of the NSFR.

The Importance of Being India, by Frank Schell, is found in the Winter 2011 issue of the NSFR.

Finally, the National Strategy Forum Review has a forthcoming special report on the U.S.-Pakistan relationship.  Stay tuned.

Geopolitics in the South China Sea and Indian Ocean Region

August 30, 2010

The recent Pentagon analysis of China’s military development noted that China is increasing its reach into the South China Sea and Indian Ocean Region.  Southeast Asian countries and India are concerned about this development.  Meanwhile, the U.S. is seeing its naval power decline as China grows stronger.  These trends present strategic opportunities for U.S. foreign policy in the region.  In many ways, increased U.S. involvement in the region and support for multilateral collaboration could turn these lemons into lemonade.

Geopolitics in the South China Sea and Indian Ocean Region: Tiny Ripples or Shifting Tides?
By Eric S. Morse