Posts Tagged ‘2012 NATO Summit’

Evaluation of the 2012 Chicago NATO Summit

June 25, 2012

New Publication Now Online: Evaluation of the 2012 Chicago NATO Summit

The 2012 Chicago NATO Summit was a significant event for the City of Chicago, the U.S., and for the Transatlantic Alliance.  On the agenda were a number of important issues affecting global security and the future of the transatlantic relationship.  Some of these were addressed substantively, others were glossed over.  In both cases, the implications of the Summit have profound effects on international relations and U.S. national security.

This special issue of the National Strategy Forum Review (NSFR) evaluates the 2012 Chicago NATO Summit on the basis of what was on the agenda, what agreements and policies were produced during the Summit, and what the consequences of these policies will be in the future.  NATO affiliates and NSFR Editorial Board Members have evaluated these criteria in the first section, titled “Evaluation of the 2012 Chicago NATO Summit.”  For the past several years, the National Strategy Forum has developed a close working relationship with the Northwestern Medill School of Journalism National Security Journalism Initiative that is funded, in part, by generous assistance from the McCormick Foundation.  In the second section, titled “Key Issues for NATO,” advanced graduate school journalism students from Medill were assigned to do first-hand interviews with NATO participants and stakeholders, and have provided reports on many of the complex issues facing NATO after the Summit.

Looking back on the May summit, much was accomplished, but there were opportunities that were missed and there are several negative implications for the future.  The articles herein provide the reader with the playbook for analyzing these issues and arriving at their own conclusions.

 To access this new NSFR Special Edition, please visit the link here.

Chicago, the 2012 G8 and NATO Summits, and U.S. National Security

May 9, 2012

This special edition of the National Strategy Forum Review (NSFR) addresses the local, national, and international implications of the 2012 NATO Summit in Chicago.  The confluence of these three parts creates the rationale for this combined issue of the NSFR.  The articles herein are a guidebook to the global relevance of the G8 and NATO Summits in May 2012, and to the ramifications of these events to Chicago and U.S. security in the future.

The publication has three interrelated parts:

On the local level, the City of Chicago has prepared to implement a security and marketing campaign for a secure and successful Summit.  Chicago hopes to leverage this historic event into tangible benefits for the City.  Meanwhile, Chicago is also addressing many other local security strategy issues the affect the long-term prosperity of the City.  These include financial deficits, deteriorating infrastructure, business flight, and physical security concerns.  The combination of the new Emanuel administration and the opportunities afforded by the NATO Summit have coalesced at a propitious time to reevaluate Chicago’s multifaceted strategy for its future.  The articles in the “Chicago’s Security Strategy” section ask this question: What is the City’s long-term strategy for prospering as a Global City?

On the national level, the G8 and NATO Summits have created discussion regarding the viability and relevance of these institutions.  Occupy Wall Street, the Coalition Against NATO and G8, and other movements have raised concerns about these organizations’ roles in global affairs.  Public vetting of these voices is an important part of the democratic process.  At the same time, some of the issues raised – including the financial, foreign policy, and social justice concerns – relate directly to U.S. national security.  The articles in the “Social Justice, NATO, and International Security” section ask: Why are NATO and the G8 relevant (or perhaps irrelevant) to U.S. national security?

On the international level, the G8 and NATO organizations are pillars of the global architecture.  They help to form the backbone of international economics, global security, and humanitarian aid.  Yet much of what these organizations do remain unclear to the public sector.  The articles in “The G8 and NATO Summits” section ask: What are the major issues facing these organizations at their respective events in May?

The Winter-Spring 2012 Special Edition is now available online at the link here.  The entire issue is also available as a PDF download at the link here.