Archive for the ‘Economic Security’ Category

Security Challenges Over the Horizon and Close to Home: Africa and Cook County, IL

March 22, 2013

Winter 2013 Edition: Now Available Online 

This issue contains two themes: U.S. security interests and challenges in Africa; and Cook County, Illinois security issues.

Part I: U.S. Security Interests in Africa

Africa is undergoing a period of both economic and political transition, and the consequences of uprising, insurgency, and terrorism, partially relating to the aftershocks of the Arab Spring.  For example, in North Africa, Libya, Algeria, Tunisia, and Morocco have been on the front lines of rapid turnover and change emanating from the Arab Spring.  In other countries, such as Mali and Somalia, Islamic insurgency has sparked regional and international military responses to stem this security threat.

Africa is generally considered low priority for U.S. national security.  However, recent trends suggest its ascent on the list of strategic priorities.  The central theme of this section is the calculus and consequences of increased U.S. attention on African security issues.  Articles include:

  • AFRICOM: A New National Security Approach for the 21st Century?
  • How the Dragon of Prosperity Uses State Power and Resources in Africa to Displace Western Influence
  • The Arab Spring, Moroccan Exceptionalism, and U.S. Strategic Interests
  • Turmoil in the Middle East: How Has Morocco Fared?
  • Operation Serval in Mali: The Fight Against Terrorism and the Strengthening of States

Part II: Cook County Urban Security

In Spring of 2012, the NSF argued that national security began at the local level, using the City of Chicago’s security strategy as a point of departure for discussing local level security issues facing other large municipalities across the U.S.  This theme is amplified with a closer look at urban security issues facing Cook County, Illinois.  The policies and strategies put in place by Cook County officials are a single component of the national security patchwork.  Without security at the local level, as in Cook County, Illinois, the national security structure is weakened.  Articles include:

  • Chicago’s Gang Problem
  • Cybersecurity and the Private Sector
  • Chicago’s FInancial Cybersecurity
  • Tackling Student Gun Violence in Chicago
  • Cyber Threats to the Power Grid
  • Climate Change and Nuclear Power
  • Risk and the Chicago Infrastructure Trust
  • Solutions for Hurricane Sandy-like Flooding
  • Illinois’ Pension Problem
  • Viewpoints on Gun Laws
  • Addressing Violence in Chicago

The National Strategy Forum Review is available online at http://www.nationalstrategy.com
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Is There a Europe to be Saved?

June 28, 2012

With the European summit on June 28-29, all eyes are on this meeting as the leaders address their region’s deteriorating economic crisis.  Can the European Union be saved?  Is there even a sense of European community to save?

Endy Zemenides, a National Strategy Forum Review Editorial Board member, discusses the problem of solidarity among the European states and why the lack of solidarity is impeding a quick solution to the economic crisis.  The ability for Europe to solidify around a common cause will have broad repercussions for U.S. national security.

Read Is There a Europe to be Saved? by Endy Zemenides at the Huffington Post.

 

 

Webcast Discussion: Anti-NATO and Pro-NATO Perspectives on the 2012 Chicago NATO Summit

May 18, 2012

The May 17, 2012 discussion between the anti-NATO and pro-NATO perspectives during the Chicago NATO 2012 Summit weekend was held at the Pritzker Military Library in downtown Chicago.  The live webcast is now archived at the YouTube link below.  The theme for the webcast was “Social Responsibility and National Security: Towards a New NATO”.

Chicago, the 2012 G8 and NATO Summits, and U.S. National Security

May 9, 2012

This special edition of the National Strategy Forum Review (NSFR) addresses the local, national, and international implications of the 2012 NATO Summit in Chicago.  The confluence of these three parts creates the rationale for this combined issue of the NSFR.  The articles herein are a guidebook to the global relevance of the G8 and NATO Summits in May 2012, and to the ramifications of these events to Chicago and U.S. security in the future.

The publication has three interrelated parts:

On the local level, the City of Chicago has prepared to implement a security and marketing campaign for a secure and successful Summit.  Chicago hopes to leverage this historic event into tangible benefits for the City.  Meanwhile, Chicago is also addressing many other local security strategy issues the affect the long-term prosperity of the City.  These include financial deficits, deteriorating infrastructure, business flight, and physical security concerns.  The combination of the new Emanuel administration and the opportunities afforded by the NATO Summit have coalesced at a propitious time to reevaluate Chicago’s multifaceted strategy for its future.  The articles in the “Chicago’s Security Strategy” section ask this question: What is the City’s long-term strategy for prospering as a Global City?

On the national level, the G8 and NATO Summits have created discussion regarding the viability and relevance of these institutions.  Occupy Wall Street, the Coalition Against NATO and G8, and other movements have raised concerns about these organizations’ roles in global affairs.  Public vetting of these voices is an important part of the democratic process.  At the same time, some of the issues raised – including the financial, foreign policy, and social justice concerns – relate directly to U.S. national security.  The articles in the “Social Justice, NATO, and International Security” section ask: Why are NATO and the G8 relevant (or perhaps irrelevant) to U.S. national security?

On the international level, the G8 and NATO organizations are pillars of the global architecture.  They help to form the backbone of international economics, global security, and humanitarian aid.  Yet much of what these organizations do remain unclear to the public sector.  The articles in “The G8 and NATO Summits” section ask: What are the major issues facing these organizations at their respective events in May?

The Winter-Spring 2012 Special Edition is now available online at the link here.  The entire issue is also available as a PDF download at the link here.

Breeding Grounds for Terrorism and Transnational Crime

July 19, 2011

As the U.S. is withdrawing from Iraq and Afghanistan, and the Department of Defense and Pentagon are cutting excess programs, security analysts are faced with the challenge of doing more with less.  How can the U.S. best use its resources, military, and intelligence tools to focus in on the major threats to U.S. national security?

Fine tuning what too look for and where to look for it is key to this process.  A team of analysts at Syracuse University’s Global Black Spots—Mapping Global Insecurity Project (GBS-MGI) is developing a new research methodology that goes beyond the traditional state level analysis to find “Black Spots,” or areas of insecurity that are beyond government control.  The team probes the local-level characteristics of a region using open source information to determine where terrorism and transnational crime may develop in the future.  Their findings provide a map of global insecurity that is being applied by U.S. intelligence agencies.

The Summer 2011 issue of the National Strategy Forum Review shares this process with our readers.  The case studies below are a sample of the estimated 600+ Black Spots operating around the globe.  This unique research demonstrates that traditional security analysis must add a deeper, more local component to the search for future security threats.

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The Pentagon’s Energy Plan

June 15, 2011

Energy security has long been the U.S.’s Achilles heel.  The Pentagon released today a new strategy aimed at developing fuel-efficient weapons, embracing non-oil energy sources, and requiring troops to behave in a more energy-responsible manner.  These plans are fleshed out in two news articles below.

Pentagon Presents Its First Energy Plan (Wall Street Journal)

Pentagon to Prioritize Energy Use in Acquisition (Defense News)

In addition, the National Strategy Forum Review has focused on energy security and energy strategy in recent issues.  The articles below amplify the Pentagon’s new approach.  The U.S. economy is already undergoing changes to its energy infrastructure and consumer behavior.  Given that the U.S. military is the single largest consumer of energy in the U.S., if not the world, the Pentagon’s new plan is a welcome step in the right direction.

Energy Performance in the Department of Defense by Oliver Fritz

Energy Security: Protecting Our Environment, Our Economy, and Our Independence by Endy Zemenides

U.S. National Security Strategy 2010

June 3, 2010

On May 27, 2010, the Obama administration released their “National Security Strategy 2010.”  Given the Memorial Day weekend, and the BP oil disaster, many news agencies glossed over this document’s release.

Five months before the government’s strategy, in December 2009, the NSFR published an in-house “U.S. National Security Strategy 2010,” which has been widely read amongst national security analysts, including those who drafted the Obama administration’s document.  Today, even after the release of the U.S. government’s document, the NSFR publication ranks #1 in a Google search result for “U.S. National Security Strategy 2010.”

We have written an brief comparison of the NSFR national security strategy and the Obama administration’s national security strategy, found in the link below.  In addition, you will find direct links to both the NSFR “U.S. National Security Strategy 2010” and the Obama administration’s “National Security Strategy 2010” documents in the links below.  We invite you to compare and contrast the documents on their own merits, and to keep in mind that they are written for different audiences and purposes.

Analysis of the Obama Administration’s “National Security Strategy 2010”
By Eric S. Morse

NSFR Publication: U.S. National Security Strategy 2010

White House Document: National Security Strategy 2010

EU Economic Crisis & US National Security

May 21, 2010

The theme for the first NSFR  blog is “The EU Economic Crisis and the Effects on U.S. National Security.”  Posted below are three articles that address this theme from different perspectives.  First, the NSF Insider article provides an overview of the EU economic crisis and its three major effects on U.S. national security.  Second, Dr. Alex Papadopoulos describes how the economic problems in Greece may cause a reshuffling of NATO priorities.  Third, Andrew Cottey summarizes the impact of the economic crisis on Ireland and its national security spending.

NSF Insider: EU Economic Crisis
By Eric S. Morse

A Strategic Silver Lining in the Greek Economic Crisis?  An Opportunity for a Systemic Security Shift in NATO’s Flank
By Dr. Alex G. Papadopoulos

Odd PIG Out: Ireland and the Economic Crisis
By Andrew Cottey