Archive for the ‘Domestic Security’ Category

Security Challenges Over the Horizon and Close to Home: Africa and Cook County, IL

March 22, 2013

Winter 2013 Edition: Now Available Online 

This issue contains two themes: U.S. security interests and challenges in Africa; and Cook County, Illinois security issues.

Part I: U.S. Security Interests in Africa

Africa is undergoing a period of both economic and political transition, and the consequences of uprising, insurgency, and terrorism, partially relating to the aftershocks of the Arab Spring.  For example, in North Africa, Libya, Algeria, Tunisia, and Morocco have been on the front lines of rapid turnover and change emanating from the Arab Spring.  In other countries, such as Mali and Somalia, Islamic insurgency has sparked regional and international military responses to stem this security threat.

Africa is generally considered low priority for U.S. national security.  However, recent trends suggest its ascent on the list of strategic priorities.  The central theme of this section is the calculus and consequences of increased U.S. attention on African security issues.  Articles include:

  • AFRICOM: A New National Security Approach for the 21st Century?
  • How the Dragon of Prosperity Uses State Power and Resources in Africa to Displace Western Influence
  • The Arab Spring, Moroccan Exceptionalism, and U.S. Strategic Interests
  • Turmoil in the Middle East: How Has Morocco Fared?
  • Operation Serval in Mali: The Fight Against Terrorism and the Strengthening of States

Part II: Cook County Urban Security

In Spring of 2012, the NSF argued that national security began at the local level, using the City of Chicago’s security strategy as a point of departure for discussing local level security issues facing other large municipalities across the U.S.  This theme is amplified with a closer look at urban security issues facing Cook County, Illinois.  The policies and strategies put in place by Cook County officials are a single component of the national security patchwork.  Without security at the local level, as in Cook County, Illinois, the national security structure is weakened.  Articles include:

  • Chicago’s Gang Problem
  • Cybersecurity and the Private Sector
  • Chicago’s FInancial Cybersecurity
  • Tackling Student Gun Violence in Chicago
  • Cyber Threats to the Power Grid
  • Climate Change and Nuclear Power
  • Risk and the Chicago Infrastructure Trust
  • Solutions for Hurricane Sandy-like Flooding
  • Illinois’ Pension Problem
  • Viewpoints on Gun Laws
  • Addressing Violence in Chicago

The National Strategy Forum Review is available online at http://www.nationalstrategy.com
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Violence and Guns in Chicago: Understanding the Background

March 12, 2013

The recent Sandy Hook school massacre has ignited a national debate regarding gun regulation and gun possession. Violence and gun-related violence should be central to measured discussion leading to a national debate. Facts and statistics are essential as a point of departure for informed discussion.

The National Strategy Forum (NSF) takes no position on the forthcoming national gun regulation / gun possession debate because we are not experts in this field. The NSF’s competency is national security strategy, wherein there is a process that begins with setting a strategic objective: “The Whole of City Approach to Chicago’s Civic Health.” The focus is on violence and gun-related violence.

The essay “Violence and Guns in Chicago: Understanding the Background” was prepared for a public program held at the Union League Club of Chicago on February 14, 2013.  The intent of the essay is to present unbiased violence and gun statistics in order to inform public discussion about the underlying root causes of violence in Chicago neighborhoods.

Violence and Guns in Chicago: Understanding the Background

By Eric S. Morse and Richard E. Friedman

Is There a Europe to be Saved?

June 28, 2012

With the European summit on June 28-29, all eyes are on this meeting as the leaders address their region’s deteriorating economic crisis.  Can the European Union be saved?  Is there even a sense of European community to save?

Endy Zemenides, a National Strategy Forum Review Editorial Board member, discusses the problem of solidarity among the European states and why the lack of solidarity is impeding a quick solution to the economic crisis.  The ability for Europe to solidify around a common cause will have broad repercussions for U.S. national security.

Read Is There a Europe to be Saved? by Endy Zemenides at the Huffington Post.

 

 

Webcast Discussion: Anti-NATO and Pro-NATO Perspectives on the 2012 Chicago NATO Summit

May 18, 2012

The May 17, 2012 discussion between the anti-NATO and pro-NATO perspectives during the Chicago NATO 2012 Summit weekend was held at the Pritzker Military Library in downtown Chicago.  The live webcast is now archived at the YouTube link below.  The theme for the webcast was “Social Responsibility and National Security: Towards a New NATO”.

Chicago, the 2012 G8 and NATO Summits, and U.S. National Security

May 9, 2012

This special edition of the National Strategy Forum Review (NSFR) addresses the local, national, and international implications of the 2012 NATO Summit in Chicago.  The confluence of these three parts creates the rationale for this combined issue of the NSFR.  The articles herein are a guidebook to the global relevance of the G8 and NATO Summits in May 2012, and to the ramifications of these events to Chicago and U.S. security in the future.

The publication has three interrelated parts:

On the local level, the City of Chicago has prepared to implement a security and marketing campaign for a secure and successful Summit.  Chicago hopes to leverage this historic event into tangible benefits for the City.  Meanwhile, Chicago is also addressing many other local security strategy issues the affect the long-term prosperity of the City.  These include financial deficits, deteriorating infrastructure, business flight, and physical security concerns.  The combination of the new Emanuel administration and the opportunities afforded by the NATO Summit have coalesced at a propitious time to reevaluate Chicago’s multifaceted strategy for its future.  The articles in the “Chicago’s Security Strategy” section ask this question: What is the City’s long-term strategy for prospering as a Global City?

On the national level, the G8 and NATO Summits have created discussion regarding the viability and relevance of these institutions.  Occupy Wall Street, the Coalition Against NATO and G8, and other movements have raised concerns about these organizations’ roles in global affairs.  Public vetting of these voices is an important part of the democratic process.  At the same time, some of the issues raised – including the financial, foreign policy, and social justice concerns – relate directly to U.S. national security.  The articles in the “Social Justice, NATO, and International Security” section ask: Why are NATO and the G8 relevant (or perhaps irrelevant) to U.S. national security?

On the international level, the G8 and NATO organizations are pillars of the global architecture.  They help to form the backbone of international economics, global security, and humanitarian aid.  Yet much of what these organizations do remain unclear to the public sector.  The articles in “The G8 and NATO Summits” section ask: What are the major issues facing these organizations at their respective events in May?

The Winter-Spring 2012 Special Edition is now available online at the link here.  The entire issue is also available as a PDF download at the link here.

The 2012 G8 and NATO Summits

March 22, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

In May 2012, leaders of the Group of 8 (G8) and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries are descending on Camp David and Chicago respectively to discuss pressing issues of global governance and international security. These meetings will have broad policy effects on their respective fields. To prepare for the following summit meetings, the National Strategy Forum Review is providing a background briefing  on these two organizations to discuss their institutional histories and contemporary relevance to global governance.

What are the institutional histories of these institutions?  Why are they relevant and important to global affairs?  What issues will be discussed during these summits?  To read the article, click on the link below.

Briefing: The 2012 G8 and NATO Summits

By Eric S. Morse 

The U.S.-Canada National Security Relationship

November 3, 2011

Canada and the U.S. operate in a rapid and continuously changing threat environment ­– acts of terrorism, economics and finance, natural disasters, pandemics, and catastrophic terrorism.  National security involves all of these events supplemented by notions of history, culture, and tradition, public diplomacy, and military concerns.  Although Canada’s population is substantially smaller than the U.S., Canada is a full partner of the U.S.  After a recent visit to Colorado Springs to visit the U.S.-Canada Tri-Command at Peterson AFB and Cheyenne Mountain, Richard Friedman shares his insights into this important security relationship.  To read the article, click on the link below.

The U.S.-Canada National Security Relationship

By Richard E. Friedman

A Maritime Model for Cyberspace Governance

September 15, 2011

Cyberspace is a unique realm where traditional concepts of law, governance, and international relations are difficult to define and more difficult to put into practice.  Meanwhile, cyber threats and cyber crime are on the rise and governments are scrambling to find legal ways to detect, apprehend, and prosecute perpetrators.  How can governments agree on acceptable legal norms?  What is the incentive to cooperate in apprehending cyber criminals? How can states form multilateral legal institutions and practices that address this challenges of cyberspace?

Mark Frazzetto’s article, A Maritime Model for Cyberspace Legal Governance, offers one view on this issue.  He argues that cyberspace be defined as an international common area and that legal arguments for governing such a space could gain insight from traditional laws of the sea.

A Maritime Model for Cyberspace Legal Governance

By Mark Frazzetto

The New Princes: An Update to Niccolò Machiavelli’s Classic

July 18, 2011

The New Princes

Niccolò Machiavelli was born in Florence, Italy in 1469 and held important posts until his death in 1527.  He was a keen observer of the errors and personal character of the rulers he served.  He synthesized his vast experience and observation of rulers, nobles, political systems and statecraft in his magnum opus, The Prince.

Machiavellian in modern times has acquired a pejorative meaning – a sinister connotation that was unknown to his peers.  However, a careful reading of this book leads to more reasonable and affirmative interpretation.

The theme of Machiavelli’s The Prince and this updated essay, The New Princes by Richard E. Friedman, is the relationship of the rulers and the ruled.  Machiavelli’s observations and conclusions regarding mankind’s motivations and weaknesses tend to be negative, rather than what we would prefer them to be.  The Prince provides great principles for the guidance of rulers and their relationship with the people, nobles, parliaments, and with the rulers of other states.

Politics is the instrument to achieve government; politics is not the instrument to achieve more politics.  The objective of The New Princes is to counter the drift of politics that is leading the state into the commode.  The following text is derived, in large part, from the marvelous insights to be found in Machiavelli’s original, with liberties taken to assist contemporary readers, and organization for rhetorical flow.  The purpose of this essay is to make the nation a bit better by a thought-provoking handbook for common cause and positive political action.

If you are motivated more by pragmatism than idealism; if you seek to correct a major wrong; if you seek to communicate with other like-minded pragmatists through use of social network technology, and explore social action among your peers that was impossible only a few years ago, there is a useful intellectual basis for your involvement.  Please consider reading the full text of my essay, The New Princes.

-By Richard E. Friedman

The Pentagon’s Energy Plan

June 15, 2011

Energy security has long been the U.S.’s Achilles heel.  The Pentagon released today a new strategy aimed at developing fuel-efficient weapons, embracing non-oil energy sources, and requiring troops to behave in a more energy-responsible manner.  These plans are fleshed out in two news articles below.

Pentagon Presents Its First Energy Plan (Wall Street Journal)

Pentagon to Prioritize Energy Use in Acquisition (Defense News)

In addition, the National Strategy Forum Review has focused on energy security and energy strategy in recent issues.  The articles below amplify the Pentagon’s new approach.  The U.S. economy is already undergoing changes to its energy infrastructure and consumer behavior.  Given that the U.S. military is the single largest consumer of energy in the U.S., if not the world, the Pentagon’s new plan is a welcome step in the right direction.

Energy Performance in the Department of Defense by Oliver Fritz

Energy Security: Protecting Our Environment, Our Economy, and Our Independence by Endy Zemenides